Promenade des Anglais – door open on paradise

Frontier between a dream and your daily problems
Frontier between a dream and your daily problems

Promenade des Anglais is a symbol of Nice and, as far as I am concerned, the strongest magnet of the whole French Riviera.  As you approach it from above, looking down through the pigeon hole of your plane, it already sends you a message of exotic beauty. I go to Nice almost every weekend, to enjoy the vitality and the charm of the place. It borders the sea between the port of Nice and the nearby Cagnes-Sur-Mer, for an extension of about 7 km.

Life on the Promenade
Life on the Promenade

You stroll, run, cycle, roller skate, take sun, eat, rest, drink coffee, read newspapers, sunbathe, swim, dive, sail, shop, walk your dog, and meet friends there. Above all, you breathe the air rich in ions from the sea breeze, and you get more optimistic as the result. If you plan visiting the south of France, try Nice first, it opens the way to this little corner of European paradise.

“Abre Alas” (Open the Way) – Ivan Lins

Dog day

Snack sharing
Snack sharing

A periodic return to the dog theme is refreshing like a green apple sorbet between fish and meat. It washes away  intricacies of  life and presents you with a straight in the eyes evidence, that simple relationships based on love, friendship and mutual satisfaction exist.

Original
Original

I guess, this lady could be an interesting person to know. Between the choice of clothes and dogs, she appears relaxed and original, as if being at ease with this combined statement underscoring  her personality.

Readers' digest
Readers’ digest

It’s a bit difficult to spot, but the lady and her dog were wearing here light feather filled jackets  in a coordinated color. I wander, if they both equally enjoyed the daily reading of “Nice Mattin”.

Conversation
Conversation

There is no evidence, that dogs can understand human language, but they are certainly very smart at reading our expressions.

Ping pong
Ping pong

Young dogs have this amazing store of unexpressed energy and joy, which can be triggered at the first hint that play time begins. Their unfailing enthusiasm for the same simple games can really be disarming.

“Young at Heart” – Tony Bennett

 

 

SINGLE SHOTS # 24

Curtain time
Curtain time

This week has been quite rich in market events, with the ECB going into negative deposit rates for the first time ever, so I’ve had some fairly animated days, and am glad to wind down in a quiet mode, as if a curtain was marking the end of a theatre play. This weekend should be hot – an opportunity to finally open the beach season.

“Curtain Time” – Dave Brubeck Quartet

Cafe’ portraiture

Portrait with permission
Portrait with permission

One of the greatest pleasures of life on the Riviera, is the rite of socializing outdoors. A cafe’ in open air is always a theatre filled with flow of most varied humanity. A famous Polish writer and playwright, Slawomir Mrozek, who spent the last years of his life in Nice, when asked about his favourite way of killing time, said: “I sit and watch”. His preferred spot for observing life was on the Promenade des Anglais, on one of the white benches, like the one from which I took this shot.

Man and his master
Man and his master

I rarely ask for permission when shooting people outdoors. In case of the first photo  it was inevitable, as the man was facing the sea, and there was nothing that would distract him even for a moment. In the one above, I was rescued by the smartphone of this young gentleman, who did not omit to chimp even in presence of his (attractive) girlfriend.

I see your face before me
I see your face before me

The open bistro’s with  some outside roofing have the advantage, that light inside can get interesting, and if you are lucky, and your subject is facing the outside, you get an almost perfect setting  for a simple but reliable portrait illumination.

” I see your face before me” – John Coltrane

SINGLE SHOTS # 23

Rehearsal
Rehearsal

I’m thinking more frequently about getting deeper into portraiture, but for now, as the   circumstances are not so favourable, I am rehearsing the equipment to make sure everything is ready. This was a test of sharpness/bokeh with the Pentax 67 and 165/2.8. I have to say the lens is sharp enough wide open, and the background blur is really mellow.

“Mellow Yellow” – Donovan

SINGLE SHOTS # 22

Lost in Monte Carlo
Lost in Monte Carlo

This has been a test shot for the 75/2.8 lens on Pentax 67. If you know this camera. you can probably imagine the scene. I was tucked away in a small niche in this underground passage leading to Port Hercule in Monaco, waiting for a subject to turn up, my camera planted on a solid monopod. When this pair of youngsters turned up, the girl noticed me, and quite lightheartedly offered a smile. The loud thunder-like thump of the Pentax probably has scared them somewhat, so I did not hang around, and went on my way quickly instead. Only while  scanning the image, I noticed the writing on boy’s T shirt. Most likely they were two infatuated Polish students, who somehow managed to put together some money for a romantic trip. They remind me of this great jazz theme.

“Let’s Get Lost” – Chet Baker

SINGLE SHOTS # 21

In love
In love

To change the topic somehow, I’d like to show this snap taken in spring in the Promenade de Paillon in Nice. I was listening the other day to my favourite jazz radio www.jazzradio.com, the Mellow Jazz channel. I almost remember all the repertoire of this stream by heart, but was somehow surprised to notice, that unexpectedly beautiful improvisations were to be found in this classic piece by Eddie Higgins Trio. This trio is famous for well groomed ballads from the great American songbooks, and is somehow closer to photographers’ hearts owing to their numerous album covers featuring famous shots by Jeanloup Sieff.

“In Love in Vain” – Eddie Higgins Trio

 

Keeping tradition

On one of my weekend strolls in Nice, I’ve run into this young man painting in the street.

In the steps of the masters
In the steps of the masters

He was, as you can see, well groomed and dressed, and had this youthful yet concentrated ado about himself and his job. It must be quite an experience, to jump into the shoes of numerous great painters, who found on the Riviera their creative heaven.  One thing is certain: here it’s easy to paint “en plain air”, because it won’t rain on your canvas too often.

Abstract
Joffrey Trani – painter and sculptor in Nice

Although the painting in question was of abstract nature, and evidently had to serve as a showcase, the young man had some clear ideas in his head about what he wanted to paint next. In fact, he put a notice on a  nearby wall: “Looking for models”.

“Model” – Simply Red

 

Les Colettes, part II

View on La Colle Sur Loup
View on Chateau de Cagnes

This is almost precisely the view depicted by Renoir in the painting “Paysage des Collettes” and it still has enough power to attract passing by photographers…

View from the front of the house towards the sea
View from the front of the house towards the sea

Inside Renoir’s museum, you continue being charmed by the light and the views over the garden towards Chateau de Cagnes and the sea, available through most of the numerous oversized windows. The light rays penetrate the house from all angles, creating plays of patterns and reflections.

Light, light, light...
Light, light, light…

The interiors are scarcely furnished, and the paintings shown are frequently from Renoir’s entourage. There are only a few original works, mainly of small size. The reason is pretty obvious: with the prices his paintings are fetching today, it would have been virtually impossible to cover the walls even of this relatively unassuming house. When I was inside, I kept on thinking, how relatively little lavish was this residence, and wondered if Renoir did not make it any more grand because of the cost. He had to be rich by the time he bought the estate, but, how much did it take him to paint, to afford an estate like this?

Maestro's dining room
Maestro’s dining room

I’ve found an answer in this short clip from the film on Modigliani, where Picasso takes Modi’ on a surprise trip to Les Colettes. It’s hard to know if what is shown was true, but it certainly is plausible.

Plane tree grooming
Plane tree grooming

The entrance of the estate houses a low modern building with the ticket counter and merchandising. It fits surprisingly well in the park. In front of it, I’ve found this young plane tree, groomed so that it should grow spreading the branches sideways to provide some shade for the tourists taking a coffee at the outside tables. The plane trees are very much a permanent part of the French landscape, both outside and inside the cities.

A touch of tradition
A touch of tradition

As I was heading back to the parking to return home, I couldn’t help noticing this familiar way of delimiting the path – plain stones bordering the gravel, so delicate and old fashioned, sign of a mind respectful of the spirit of tradition.

“Milestones” –  Miles Davis

Les Colettes, part I

This is post nr: 100.

Pierre Auguste Renoir in later years of his life  has developed rheumatoid arthritis. The doctors advised him to move from the Champagne region in the northern part of France, to the warmth of the south. In 1907, at the age of 66, he bought a small farm surrounded by a park filled with olive and citrus trees, called Les Colettes, on the hills right above Cagnes-sur-Mer, not far away from Nice.

The farm through mimosa shrubs
The farm through mimosa shrubs

During the next year he built next to the farm a proper house, where he was to spend the rest of his life, mostly confined to a wheelchair. This place today is hosting the Renoir Museum. I went there this spring, curious to see it after it was closed for more than a year for renovation.

The house of Renoir
The house of Renoir

What has immediately struck me, was the beauty of the place and park, and a total lack of   architectonic user friendliness inside the house for someone who had to move around on a wheelchair. It is quite clear, that at the turn of the century, servants were making up for lack of elevators and modern bathroom solutions for people with displacement problems.

Magic of light
Magic of light

The light was just beautiful, tense and clear, but without the scorching power of heat typical of the summer. When I looked around it become completely obvious that you could instantly fall in love with this place, particularly if colours and light were the primary elements at the base of your art.

Sculptured plants
Sculptured plants

Here and there you could spot some exotic plant, and although it is not clear which of these were present there in Renoir’s times, the monumental appearance of these Yuccas has reminded me, that it was at Les Colettes that Renoir took up seriously sculpture. Well, he took it up in a way… because he could not use his hands any more, so he gave indications to his assistants. This is probably why his bronze sculptures have not reached prices anywhere near close to these of his “original” paintings.

Farm selfie
Farm selfie

Here and there in the garden, you can see reproductions of his landscape paintings placed roughly in the spot where he actually worked on them. The effect is truly stunning, as it shows you how he saw the world with his eyes. There is a very interesting film available, shown in the museum, where Renoir paints inside the house in his studio, his brushes clenched in his wrist.

View from the hill
View from the hill

cont…

“The Folks Who Live On The Hill” – Johnny Hartman